MSR Dromedary Bag


MSR Dromedary Bag

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MSR 10L Dromedary Bag Hydration Bladder Coal-black One Size

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MSR 10L Dromedary Bag Hydration Bladder Coal-black One Size

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MSR 6L Dromedary Bag Hydration Bladder Menacing One Size

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  • The British Columbian Wilderness and the Baddest Cut Filter Ever Built

    11/13/15 ,via Gizmodo

    From one's own viewpoint, I'm not the car-camping type, but I will say that the basecamp line (DreamTime pad, Dorado HD sleeping bag) were incredibly comfy. They were teeming, plush, warm, and it was easily the best sleep I've had in a tent, The clean water output

  • The Canadian Wilderness And The Baddest Sea water Filter Ever Built

    01/04/16 ,via Gizmodo Australia

    As one sees it, I'm not the car-camping type, but I will say that the basecamp line (DreamTime pad, Dorado HD sleeping bag) were incredibly comfy. They were concentrated, plush, warm, and it was easily the best sleep I've had in a tent, The clean water output

  • ​How To Develop A Snow Shelter

    01/26/15 ,via Gizmodo

    Hankering something fun and productive to do during this whole giant blizzard thing? Why not learn how to build a snow shelter? It could put by your life one day but, more importantly, they're just a ton of fun to make. Here's how.



Dromedary Bag

Dromedary Bag

MSR 2L Dromedary Bag for Backpacking Camping Water Storage with Fill ...

MSR 2L Dromedary Bag for Backpacking Camping Water Storage with Fill ...

Details about MSR Hydration Kit for Dromedary Bags

Details about MSR Hydration Kit for Dromedary Bags



The British Columbian Wilderness and the Baddest Not be sensible Filter Ever Built - Gizmodo

300 miles north of Vancouver lies the Terrific Bear Rainforest. It’s a huge, rugged, chunk of land with ample diversity of scenery, and the best interest is that it is very, very sparsely populated. Think Yellowstone minus the tourists. In a nutshell, you want to go to there. I had a series of places I needed to be that were on three of the far corners of the U. S. (and beyond), and there was just no way I was prevalent to be able to drive it, so I had to say good bye to my beloved van for a bit. I packed a suitcase and a backpack, locked the doors, and hopped a energetic flight to Vancouver. [Check out the video highlights]. I had been invited on this trip by Cascade Designs, the company that fare MSR and Therm-a-rest backpacking and camping gear. Press trips are strange animals. A company brings a conglomeration of reporters out to test or experience some product or products they make. Hopefully the product is actually something good writing about. Sometimes it isn’t, and that’s when you have to have an awkward conversation. Different journalists and different outlets have wildly different philosophies about these trips. Some prosaic-out refuse all of them because of the obvious hazard of conflict of interest. First, I don’t say yes to very many of them. I only go if I legitimately think I can get a confabulation out of it. Second, I make it very clear that bringing me on the trip does not guarantee coverage. And if I do cover it, I may not say very good things about it (ask Sony and GoPro). One company, who shall remain nameless, brought me to Austin to show off its new product. They wined us and dined us for five days, but their work sucked. It sucked very much, and it wasn’t something Giz readers naturally cared enough about to even warrant a mean list-up. I told the company that, and the company was sad, but they said. Source: gizmodo.com

The Canadian Wilderness And The Baddest A-one Filter Ever Built - Gizmodo Australia

I had a series of places I needed to be that were on three of the far corners of the U. S. (and beyond), and there was just no way I was prosperous to be able to drive it, so I had to say good bye to my beloved van for a bit. I parked Ashley (The Beast) at a cheap, long-term lot near the Portland Airport. I overflowing a suitcase and a packpack, locked the doors, and hopped a quick flight to Vancouver. I had been invited on this trip by Cascade Designs, the troop that make MSR and Therm-a-rest backpacking and camping gear. Press trips are strange animals. A concern brings a group of reporters out to test or experience some product or products they make. Hopefully the product is truly something worth writing about. Different journalists and different outlets have wildly different philosophies about these trips. Some inactive-out refuse all of them because of the obvious hazard of conflict of interest. First, I don’t say yes to very many of them. I only go if I legitimately think I can get a recital out of it. Second, I make it very clear that bringing me on the trip does not guarantee coverage. And if I do cover it, I may not say very commendable things about it (ask Sony and GoPro). One company, who shall remain nameless, brought me to Austin to show off its new product. They wined us and dined us for five days, but their by-product sucked. It sucked very much, and it wasn’t something Giz readers naturally cared enough about to even warrant a mean forgive-up. I told the company that, and the company was sad, but they said thanks for the feedback and that’s the end of it. Press trips are also weird because you are thrown in with a society of strangers and you never know what you’re going to get. Journalists are competitive animals, and there can be a lot of jockeying, or they may not take themselves so seriously. PR people can be incredibly. Source: www.gizmodo.com.au

​How To Shape A Snow Shelter - Gizmodo

Why Strengthen A Snow Shelter. Do it right and your snow shelter will maintain a constant 32-degree (F) temperature privy, no matter what conditions are like outside. That's because snow is mostly composed of trapped air and trapped air is what insulates. So that's not only a better sequel than your tent, potentially allowing you to survive with inadequate clothing or sleeping materials for the weather, but a snow cover can be built with minimal equipment and only basic knowledge. Step One: Identify Risks Don't build a snow screen some place that's going to be wiped out by a landslide, avalanche, falling rocks, falling trees or similar. Hiding in a snow hole can prevent Search And Rescue from finding you. It's also easy to lose the location of your snow shelter if you leave it at blackness or during a storm, in which it could become buried. Making it with a "flag" of brightly colored clothing or similar in such a way that it won't be buried by the snow or torn away by the boloney is therefore a great idea. That can also keep you or your friends from walking over the top, which may collapse the shelter. Step Two: Find A Location Keep the overhead dangers in mind and don't try and sleep someplace that's going to get you killed. You obviously need large amounts of snow to increase a snow shelter. You can just build one on any level ground. But, why not make the terrain work for you and try to find the lee side of a hill or disconcert or similar where snow has naturally gathered. A natural depression can also save you some of the mound-building effort. just opt for snow down it then tunnel into it from one end. Step Three: Easy Shelter Types Most of the instructions here are prevalent to be for a quinzee shelter. Source: indefinitelywild.gizmodo.com


greenlake msr hooverwilderness dromedarybag

Green Lake Backpacking Trip
MSR Dromedary Bag
Photo by Jeff Moser / BikeCarson.com on Flickr

MSR Dromedary Bag
Photo by Jeff Moser / BikeCarson.com on Flickr

MSR Dromedary Bag
Photo by Jeff Moser / BikeCarson.com on Flickr